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Posted by Eric Gunnewegh at 10:21 on Friday 9 February    Add 'An Introduction to Hibernate 3 Annotations' site to delicious  Add 'An Introduction to Hibernate 3 Annotations' site to technorati  Add 'An Introduction to Hibernate 3 Annotations' site to digg  Add 'An Introduction to Hibernate 3 Annotations' site to dzone

Over the years, Hibernate has become close to the defacto standard in the world of Java database persistence. It is powerful, flexible, and boasts excellent performance. In this article, John Ferguson Smart looks at how Java 5 annotations can be used to simplify your Hibernate code and make coding your persistence layer even easier.

Posted by Eric Gunnewegh at 7:32 on Wednesday 20 September    Add 'Writing Performant EJB Beans in the Java EE 5 Platform (EJB 3.0) Using Annotations' site to delicious  Add 'Writing Performant EJB Beans in the Java EE 5 Platform (EJB 3.0) Using Annotations' site to technorati  Add 'Writing Performant EJB Beans in the Java EE 5 Platform (EJB 3.0) Using Annotations' site to digg  Add 'Writing Performant EJB Beans in the Java EE 5 Platform (EJB 3.0) Using Annotations' site to dzone

The Enterprise Java Beans (EJB) 3.0 specification vastly improves the simplicity of programming enterprise beans. This promises to increase your productivity as a developer. But what about the productivity of your production system? Will it be fast enough to meet the demands of your organization, or will you spend all your newly found free time refactoring code for performance?

This article shows you how to get the best performance out of the new EJB 3.0 programming model. The Java Enterprise Performance team looked at performance in three broad areas: developer performance, performance of 3.0 session and message-driven beans, and performance of Java technology persistent entities.

Posted by Eric Gunnewegh at 13:48 on Monday 7 August    Add 'Security Annotations and Authorization in GlassFish and the Java EE 5 SDK' site to delicious  Add 'Security Annotations and Authorization in GlassFish and the Java EE 5 SDK' site to technorati  Add 'Security Annotations and Authorization in GlassFish and the Java EE 5 SDK' site to digg  Add 'Security Annotations and Authorization in GlassFish and the Java EE 5 SDK' site to dzone

Security is very important in the enterprise environment. In the Java EE 5 / GlassFish environment, you can achieve security using the following options:

- Transport Level Security (TLS) / Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) technologies
- Authentication and Authorization
- Message Level Security (for Web Services in GlassFish only)

This article discusses authentication and authorization.

Posted by Barend Garvelink at 22:44 on Friday 3 February    Add 'Java and the Empowered Database' site to delicious  Add 'Java and the Empowered Database' site to technorati  Add 'Java and the Empowered Database' site to digg  Add 'Java and the Empowered Database' site to dzone

In het artikel Introducing R/O Mapping publiceert Norbert Ehreke het Amber framework om Java objecten aan een RDBMS te mappen – met de database als uitgangspunt. Er wordt, met andere woorden, niet geprobeerd om een OO-structuur op een relationele dataset te projecteren, maar omgekeerd.

An unwritten consensus in the industry is that the best approach in solving these problems is a process where the business requirements are modelled in the object domain and where the resulting object model is mapped via an O/R mapping framework into the relational database system.

This article proposes a reversed approach where the modelling is done in the relational tier and as much business logic as possible is handled within the database by employing a set of stored procedures as the middle tier. A lightweight Java API, called Amber, is introduced that uses Java annotations instead of XML descriptors to help marshal result sets to Java objects and back into the database.

Niet alleen kan dit interessant zijn bij nieuwbouw tegen een bestaande database, het sluit ook mooi aan bij het adagium "Je data leeft langer dan je applicatie (dus zorg dat je datamodel klopt).".

Lees het artikel op TheServerSide:
http://www.theserverside.com/articles/article.tss?l=JavaEmpoweredDatabase

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 21:58 on Thursday 25 August    Add 'A case against Annotations' site to delicious  Add 'A case against Annotations' site to technorati  Add 'A case against Annotations' site to digg  Add 'A case against Annotations' site to dzone

Robin Sharp, in "Annotations: Don’t Mess with Java," says that "Annotations are a major kludge on the landscape. They don’t fit and we don’t need them; but you just know that they’ll be picked up by framework junkies and abused horribly." [softwarereality.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 18:51 on Tuesday 22 March    Add 'Java Toolbox An annotation-based persistence framework' site to delicious  Add 'Java Toolbox An annotation-based persistence framework' site to technorati  Add 'Java Toolbox An annotation-based persistence framework' site to digg  Add 'Java Toolbox An annotation-based persistence framework' site to dzone

Use J2SE 5 annotations to eliminate getters and setters Allen Holub [javaworld]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 15:02 on Friday 11 March    Add 'Using Annotations to add Validity Constraints to JavaBeans Properties' site to delicious  Add 'Using Annotations to add Validity Constraints to JavaBeans Properties' site to technorati  Add 'Using Annotations to add Validity Constraints to JavaBeans Properties' site to digg  Add 'Using Annotations to add Validity Constraints to JavaBeans Properties' site to dzone

This article shows how you can use the new Annotations feature of J2SE 5.0 to add constraints like minimum and maximum length, regular expressions, and more to your JavaBean properties. [java.sun.com]

Posted by jcn at 23:08 on Wednesday 2 March    Add 'Aspect-Oriented Annotations' site to delicious  Add 'Aspect-Oriented Annotations' site to technorati  Add 'Aspect-Oriented Annotations' site to digg  Add 'Aspect-Oriented Annotations' site to dzone

Aspect-Oriented Programming (AOP) and attributes are two leading-edge programming concepts, each with typical applications. By combining them, using attributes to indicate where AOP code should execute, you can effectively declare new Java syntax. Bill Burke introduces this new technique. [onjava.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 13:43 on Friday 11 February    Add 'Learn to Use the New Annotation Feature of Java 5.0' site to delicious  Add 'Learn to Use the New Annotation Feature of Java 5.0' site to technorati  Add 'Learn to Use the New Annotation Feature of Java 5.0' site to digg  Add 'Learn to Use the New Annotation Feature of Java 5.0' site to dzone

Developers have always struggled to find ways of adding semantic data to their Java code. They had to: Java didn’t have a native metadata facility. But that’s all changed with version 5.0 of Java, which allows annotations as a typed part of the language. [devx.com]


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