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Posted by Barend Garvelink at 13:19 on Sunday 29 October    Add 'Artima interview: A framework for Swing' site to delicious  Add 'Artima interview: A framework for Swing' site to technorati  Add 'Artima interview: A framework for Swing' site to digg  Add 'Artima interview: A framework for Swing' site to dzone

De Artima Developer Community heeft een interview geplaatst met Hans Muller, de spec lead van JSR-296.

The new Swing Application Framework JSR (JSR 296) aims to do for client-side Java applications what many successful Web frameworks have done for server-side code: Abstract out common application patterns with the goal of making development easier and less error-prone. In this interview with Artima, JSR 296 spec lead Hans Muller discusses patterns and issues common to Swing-based desktop applications, and describes how the new framework addresses those issues.

Het ontbreken van een standaard applicatieskelet zie ik als een van de hoofdredenen waarom zowel het Java applet als de Java application nooit echt van de grond zijn gekomen. Waar je met een Delphi, Flash of Visual Basic in een paar klikken een blanco applicatie kan opstarten, heb je het in Java altijd vanaf public static void main(String[] args) helemaal zelf mogen opknappen.

Tien jaar na de geboorte van Java hebben we nu JSR-296 en diverse andere applicatieframeworks (o.a. Eclipse RCP). Too little, too late?

[http://www.artima.com/lejava/articles/swingframework.html]

Posted by Ruud Steeghs at 19:42 on Monday 26 June    Add 'Keep JMS simple with Spring and MantaRay' site to delicious  Add 'Keep JMS simple with Spring and MantaRay' site to technorati  Add 'Keep JMS simple with Spring and MantaRay' site to digg  Add 'Keep JMS simple with Spring and MantaRay' site to dzone

Create a simple, distributed application framework
Java Platform, Enterprise Edition is complex and cumbersome. Using lightweight frameworks is a new trend, as illustrated by the popularity of Spring, a lightweight application framework. This article describes how to integrate Spring with MantaRay, a lightweight messaging solution, to create a distributed, easy-to-use-and-deploy application framework.

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 10:56 on Monday 20 March    Add 'Comparing Web Frameworks: RIFE' site to delicious  Add 'Comparing Web Frameworks: RIFE' site to technorati  Add 'Comparing Web Frameworks: RIFE' site to digg  Add 'Comparing Web Frameworks: RIFE' site to dzone

As a contribution to Simon Brown’s series of articles where he compares Java web application frameworks, I created a RIFE version of the read-only blog that currently serves as an example. [rifers.org]

See also Comparing Web Frameworks: Wicket

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 10:21 on Thursday 9 March    Add 'Comparing Web Frameworks: Wicket' site to delicious  Add 'Comparing Web Frameworks: Wicket' site to technorati  Add 'Comparing Web Frameworks: Wicket' site to digg  Add 'Comparing Web Frameworks: Wicket' site to dzone

Guillermo Castro has written up Wicket, in "Comparing Web Frameworks: Wicket," based on Simon Brown’s series of articles comparing web frameworks. Brown put forth a set of comparison points, and Wicket 1.1 was used to fulfill them. Wicket’s similarity (on the surface) to Tapestry and some other similar frameworks is hard to deny. [theserverside]

Posted by Ruud Steeghs at 14:52 on Saturday 28 January    Add 'J2EE design decisions — Learn how to discern which design patterns and frameworks would work best for your enterprise applications' site to delicious  Add 'J2EE design decisions — Learn how to discern which design patterns and frameworks would work best for your enterprise applications' site to technorati  Add 'J2EE design decisions — Learn how to discern which design patterns and frameworks would work best for your enterprise applications' site to digg  Add 'J2EE design decisions — Learn how to discern which design patterns and frameworks would work best for your enterprise applications' site to dzone

In this article, an excerpt from POJOs in Action (Manning Publications, January 2006), Chris Richardson presents five questions developers must ask themselves when designing enterprise applications

If we blindly used POJOs (plain-old Java objects) and lightweight frameworks, we would be repeating the mistake the enterprise Java community made with EJB (Enterprise JavaBeans). Every technology has both strengths and weaknesses, and it’s important to know how to choose the most appropriate one for a given situation.

This book is about implementing enterprise applications using design patterns and lightweight frameworks. To enable you to use them effectively in your application, it provides a decision-making framework that consists of five key questions that must be answered when designing an application or implementing the business logic for an individual use-case. By consciously addressing each of these design issues and understanding the consequences of your decisions, you will vastly improve the quality of your application.

In this article you will get an overview of those five design decisions. I briefly describe each design decision’s options as well as its respective benefits and drawbacks.

Posted by Ruud Steeghs at 14:17 on Sunday 22 January    Add 'Rapid Java Web Application Development with Tapestry' site to delicious  Add 'Rapid Java Web Application Development with Tapestry' site to technorati  Add 'Rapid Java Web Application Development with Tapestry' site to digg  Add 'Rapid Java Web Application Development with Tapestry' site to dzone

Tapestry is a powerful and innovative framework for developing component-based Web applications. With Tapestry 4, things get even better.

Posted by Ruud Steeghs at 14:15 on Sunday 22 January    Add 'Tim Shadel says JSF isn’t their choice for the future' site to delicious  Add 'Tim Shadel says JSF isn’t their choice for the future' site to technorati  Add 'Tim Shadel says JSF isn’t their choice for the future' site to digg  Add 'Tim Shadel says JSF isn’t their choice for the future' site to dzone

Tim Shadel, in a podcasted talk linked to from “JSF: The 7-Layer Burrito I Won’t Eat Again,” says that after using JavaServer Faces for months, they’ve decided that they wouldn’t use JSF in the future. The primary reason? JSF uses POST, not GET, and as a result, links to specific aren’t conversational state isn’t preserved, unlike with REST.

In the podcast, he says that the URL hiding affects JSF from start to finish. While he says JSF may be all right for applications that use internal state, it will be awful for applications that should expose content urls to, say, search engines – like blogs or other content applications. Further, the URL hiding affects deployment, because applications can’t refer to other applications’ states.

The JavaServer Faces specification does indicate that POST is used exclusively; the form tag doesn’t define a pass-through attribute for “method” to allow use of GET, and while it may be possible to create a render kit for JSF that enables use of alternate methods, this seems like a strange requirement for application developers. However, a quick search on Google does show a few examples of embedding data in a URL for use in JSF.

Of further interest is the note that this is the “first of a long list of reasons why the JSF 7-layer burrito won’t be on my round for seconds.”

What are your experiences and opinions about this? Is this a critical limitation of JSF? Would this affect your willingness to adopt JSF in public-facing applications? Why or why not?

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 13:26 on Monday 19 December    Add 'Add Zing to your unit tests' site to delicious  Add 'Add Zing to your unit tests' site to technorati  Add 'Add Zing to your unit tests' site to digg  Add 'Add Zing to your unit tests' site to dzone

Introducing a framework for generic, productive, reliable, and maintenance-free unit testsTanmay Ambre and Abhijeet Kesarkar [javaworld]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 10:12 on Friday 25 November    Add 'Further Down the Trail' site to delicious  Add 'Further Down the Trail' site to technorati  Add 'Further Down the Trail' site to digg  Add 'Further Down the Trail' site to dzone

In our last article, we got a brief introduction to Trails, a framework that aims to bring a drastic productivity increase to Java web application development. We quickly created a simple application and saw how easy it is to get started, but we didn’t have time to cover a lot of the more interesting features of Trails. To steal a great quote from Larry Wall, the inventor of Perl, Trails is designed “to make easy things easy and hard things possible.” I hope I convinced you last time that easy things are indeed easy. Now it’s time to look at some of the features that allow you to build a real application. Read the rest here.

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 9:59 on Tuesday 18 October    Add 'Unit Testing Hibernate Mapping Configurations' site to delicious  Add 'Unit Testing Hibernate Mapping Configurations' site to technorati  Add 'Unit Testing Hibernate Mapping Configurations' site to digg  Add 'Unit Testing Hibernate Mapping Configurations' site to dzone

In the last few years, Hibernate has become one of the most popular Java open source frameworks available. However, developers don’t always remember that the mapping files that drive Hibernate’s behavior are as much a part of the program as the Java code. These files can contain defects, behave unexpectedly, and break when you change other parts of your system. In this article, I will show how you can use unit testing to assess the correctness of your Hibernate configuration. The article is a step-by-step approach that also explains some of the more common difficulties you may encounter while using Hibernate. [testdriven.com]


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