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Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 12:10 on Friday 14 October    Add 'What Is Spring, Part 2' site to delicious  Add 'What Is Spring, Part 2' site to technorati  Add 'What Is Spring, Part 2' site to digg  Add 'What Is Spring, Part 2' site to dzone

In part one of this two-part excerpt from Spring: A Developer’s Notebook, authors Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland showed you how to automate a simple application and enable it for Spring. Today, the authors will cover how to use Spring to help you develop a simple, clean, web-based user interface. [onjava.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 22:56 on Monday 10 October    Add 'What Is Spring, Part 1' site to delicious  Add 'What Is Spring, Part 1' site to technorati  Add 'What Is Spring, Part 1' site to digg  Add 'What Is Spring, Part 1' site to dzone

In this first of a two-part series excerpted from Spring: A Developer’s Notebook, authors Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland help you understand how you can use Spring to produce clean, effective applications. In part 1, they take a simple application and show you how to automate it and enable it for Spring. [onjava.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 21:58 on Thursday 25 August    Add 'A case against Annotations' site to delicious  Add 'A case against Annotations' site to technorati  Add 'A case against Annotations' site to digg  Add 'A case against Annotations' site to dzone

Robin Sharp, in "Annotations: Don’t Mess with Java," says that "Annotations are a major kludge on the landscape. They don’t fit and we don’t need them; but you just know that they’ll be picked up by framework junkies and abused horribly." [softwarereality.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 11:51 on Monday 18 July    Add 'Test Framework Comparison' site to delicious  Add 'Test Framework Comparison' site to technorati  Add 'Test Framework Comparison' site to digg  Add 'Test Framework Comparison' site to dzone

Currently, JUnit remains the de facto standard for unit testing in Java. Justin Lee has written up a comparison between JUnit, JTiger, and TestNG, focusing on the differences between them in simple cases to illustrate when and where each might be used, and highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each. [theserverside]

Related: Parasoft JTest 7 generates JUnit tests from running apps

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 12:18 on Monday 9 May    Add 'Spring WebFlow Sneak Preview: Reuse and Framework Abstraction' site to delicious  Add 'Spring WebFlow Sneak Preview: Reuse and Framework Abstraction' site to technorati  Add 'Spring WebFlow Sneak Preview: Reuse and Framework Abstraction' site to digg  Add 'Spring WebFlow Sneak Preview: Reuse and Framework Abstraction' site to dzone

Spring WebFlow is a new Web framework that brings an innovative and highly structured approach to building Web applications. Get a sneak peek of the features in this next-generation Spring offering. [devx.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 13:04 on Monday 4 April    Add 'TestNG: The next generation of unit testing' site to delicious  Add 'TestNG: The next generation of unit testing' site to technorati  Add 'TestNG: The next generation of unit testing' site to digg  Add 'TestNG: The next generation of unit testing' site to dzone

Leverage TestNG for unit, synchronous, asynchronous, and parallel testing
Thierry Janaudy [javaworld.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 13:00 on Thursday 24 March    Add 'Java Component Development: A Conceptual Framework' site to delicious  Add 'Java Component Development: A Conceptual Framework' site to technorati  Add 'Java Component Development: A Conceptual Framework' site to digg  Add 'Java Component Development: A Conceptual Framework' site to dzone

In general terms, a component is one or more classes with an external API that satisfy some requirement. But how do you build components that are really practical–that handle configuration changes or third-party integration well? Palash Ghosh has some ideas about the concepts behind components. [onjava.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 14:13 on Monday 21 March    Add 'Patch an exception-handling framework' site to delicious  Add 'Patch an exception-handling framework' site to technorati  Add 'Patch an exception-handling framework' site to digg  Add 'Patch an exception-handling framework' site to dzone

This article describes the Patch framework, an exception-handling framework for Java programs. It forces exception handling to remain outside a system’s main business logic. In addition, that business logic is not affected when the way an exception is handled changes.

Decide at runtime how to handle exceptions Niranjan R. Kamath [javaworld.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 13:08 on Wednesday 9 March    Add 'A Look at Commons Chain: The New Java Framework, Part 1' site to delicious  Add 'A Look at Commons Chain: The New Java Framework, Part 1' site to technorati  Add 'A Look at Commons Chain: The New Java Framework, Part 1' site to digg  Add 'A Look at Commons Chain: The New Java Framework, Part 1' site to dzone

In part one of a two-part series, Bill Siggelkow covers the basics of Chain, a promising new framework from the Jakarta Commons subproject that lets you integrate Chain into the Struts build process. In part two, Bill will cover how Chain is being applied to Struts and other projects. Bill is the author of O’Reilly’s Jakarta Struts Cookbook. [onjava.com]


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