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Posted by Jan-Hendrik Kuperus at 12:17 on Friday 5 December    Add 'Configure JBoss WS on multiple network interfaces' site to delicious  Add 'Configure JBoss WS on multiple network interfaces' site to technorati  Add 'Configure JBoss WS on multiple network interfaces' site to digg  Add 'Configure JBoss WS on multiple network interfaces' site to dzone

The JBoss WebServices package is a nice library to get your webservice kickstarted in no-time. One of its features is the automatic generation of a WSDL for your webservice endpoint. There is however a slight annoyance when you try to use this on a machine with two network interfaces.

On a single interface machine, JBoss automatically fills in the IP address or hostname of that interface in the <soap:address/> WSDL entry. No problems there. But, if you have a machine with two interfaces, for example one for internal and one for external access, then JBoss is likely to screw things up.

This is due to the following configuration directive in the jbossas/server/production/deploy/jbossws.sar/jbossws.beans/META-INF/jboss-beans.xml:


<property name="webServiceHost">${jboss.bind.address}</property>

This property causes JBoss to use the bind address in the WSDL rewriting/generation. Even if you start the server with -b 0.0.0.0, which binds it to all interfaces, JBoss still selects a single interface to use in this property.

The solution to this is luckily very simple: if this property is removed from the configuration file, JBoss will rewrite the WSDL with the address of the interface on which the request came in.

It does make me wonder, why is this not the default setting? Would it not be easier to drop in a server anywhere and it automatically exposes correct WSDL files on all interfaces? Then, if you want to restrict it to a single interface, add the property shown above.

–Jan-Hendrik Kuperus
http://blojsom.jhkuperus.nl/blog

Posted by Ruud Steeghs at 19:22 on Tuesday 21 February    Add 'J2EE Without the Application Server' site to delicious  Add 'J2EE Without the Application Server' site to technorati  Add 'J2EE Without the Application Server' site to digg  Add 'J2EE Without the Application Server' site to dzone

J2EE apps sound big because they usually are big, running on big enterprise-class application servers–servers that often provide a lot of functionality that you don’t really want or need. In this article, Guy Pardon advocates a mix-and-match approach to combining Spring with best-of-breed persistence and transaction frameworks to build enterprise applications without a traditional J2EE app server.

Posted by Ruud Steeghs at 14:52 on Saturday 28 January    Add 'J2EE design decisions — Learn how to discern which design patterns and frameworks would work best for your enterprise applications' site to delicious  Add 'J2EE design decisions — Learn how to discern which design patterns and frameworks would work best for your enterprise applications' site to technorati  Add 'J2EE design decisions — Learn how to discern which design patterns and frameworks would work best for your enterprise applications' site to digg  Add 'J2EE design decisions — Learn how to discern which design patterns and frameworks would work best for your enterprise applications' site to dzone

In this article, an excerpt from POJOs in Action (Manning Publications, January 2006), Chris Richardson presents five questions developers must ask themselves when designing enterprise applications

If we blindly used POJOs (plain-old Java objects) and lightweight frameworks, we would be repeating the mistake the enterprise Java community made with EJB (Enterprise JavaBeans). Every technology has both strengths and weaknesses, and it’s important to know how to choose the most appropriate one for a given situation.

This book is about implementing enterprise applications using design patterns and lightweight frameworks. To enable you to use them effectively in your application, it provides a decision-making framework that consists of five key questions that must be answered when designing an application or implementing the business logic for an individual use-case. By consciously addressing each of these design issues and understanding the consequences of your decisions, you will vastly improve the quality of your application.

In this article you will get an overview of those five design decisions. I briefly describe each design decision’s options as well as its respective benefits and drawbacks.

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 19:15 on Thursday 8 September    Add 'Building J2EE Projects with Maven' site to delicious  Add 'Building J2EE Projects with Maven' site to technorati  Add 'Building J2EE Projects with Maven' site to digg  Add 'Building J2EE Projects with Maven' site to dzone

Vincent Massol offers some real-life experience building J2EE applications with Maven. Using the example of a Petstore app, Massol shows you how to generate J2EE artifacts (EJB JARs, WARs, EARs) with Maven. He is coauthor of Maven: A Developer’s Notebook. [onjava.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 20:16 on Thursday 21 July    Add 'Bean-Managed Transaction Suspension in J2EE' site to delicious  Add 'Bean-Managed Transaction Suspension in J2EE' site to technorati  Add 'Bean-Managed Transaction Suspension in J2EE' site to digg  Add 'Bean-Managed Transaction Suspension in J2EE' site to dzone

Container-managed transactions seem more capable than bean-managed transactions in the EJB spec, with the latter unable to, for example, suspend and resume transactions. But what looks like a limitation isn’t necessarily so, according to Dmitry Maximovich, who shows you how to get to the underlying TransactionManager, making BMT as powerful as CMT. [onjava.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 14:34 on Wednesday 13 July    Add 'Rails vs. J2EE' site to delicious  Add 'Rails vs. J2EE' site to technorati  Add 'Rails vs. J2EE' site to digg  Add 'Rails vs. J2EE' site to dzone

IBM has published an article comparing Ruby on Rails to J2EE (more specifically, against the combination of Tomcat, JSP, and Hibernate). [agileprogrammer]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 14:25 on Monday 13 June    Add 'Asynchronous JavaScript Technology and XML (AJAX) with Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition' site to delicious  Add 'Asynchronous JavaScript Technology and XML (AJAX) with Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition' site to technorati  Add 'Asynchronous JavaScript Technology and XML (AJAX) with Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition' site to digg  Add 'Asynchronous JavaScript Technology and XML (AJAX) with Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition' site to dzone

Learn how to use Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) with the Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) to create rich Internet applications. [java.sun.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 17:54 on Thursday 26 May    Add 'Constructing Services with J2EE' site to delicious  Add 'Constructing Services with J2EE' site to technorati  Add 'Constructing Services with J2EE' site to digg  Add 'Constructing Services with J2EE' site to dzone

Web services are a popular means of deploying service-oriented applications, and the standards in J2EE 1.4 make it easier to develop services that are portable and interoperable. Debu Panda shows you how, and takes a look at how things will get easier in J2EE 5.0. [onjava.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 14:34 on Thursday 5 May    Add 'Faster J2EE App builds with Best Practice Patterns' site to delicious  Add 'Faster J2EE App builds with Best Practice Patterns' site to technorati  Add 'Faster J2EE App builds with Best Practice Patterns' site to digg  Add 'Faster J2EE App builds with Best Practice Patterns' site to dzone

Anonymous Reader writes “Rational Software Architect Enterprise Patterns can help you rapidly build J2EE applications using reusable assets that represent best practices. This article shows you how modeling components, or patterns, can assist model-driven development, enabling you to unify the aspects of software design and development.” [developerworks]

Posted by jcn at 17:27 on Tuesday 26 April    Add 'Migrate Your J2EE Apps from EJB to Hibernate' site to delicious  Add 'Migrate Your J2EE Apps from EJB to Hibernate' site to technorati  Add 'Migrate Your J2EE Apps from EJB to Hibernate' site to digg  Add 'Migrate Your J2EE Apps from EJB to Hibernate' site to dzone

You’ve decided to switch from EJB to Hibernate for persistence in your J2EE applications, but you don’t know what to do with your existing EJB tier. Learn how a few decisions upfront, some simple ground rules, and design patterns can smooth the transition. [devx.com]


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