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Posted by Patrick Kik at 19:11 on Wednesday 16 March    Add 'MiGLayout – The Java Layout Manager for Swing, SWT and JavaFX' site to delicious  Add 'MiGLayout – The Java Layout Manager for Swing, SWT and JavaFX' site to technorati  Add 'MiGLayout – The Java Layout Manager for Swing, SWT and JavaFX' site to digg  Add 'MiGLayout – The Java Layout Manager for Swing, SWT and JavaFX' site to dzone

I’m not a fan of developing user interfaces and that’s an understatement. I really hate the Swing layout managers. But then I discovered MiGLayout!

With MiGLayout it’s really easy to create a GUI. Here’s a short example (from their website):

To give you an idea about how the layout manager works, below is the source code for the Quick Start panel. Note that all gaps (white space) is added automatically. The gaps will be correct for the platform it is run. Even the white space around the components (border) is automatic!

JPanel panel = new JPanel(new MigLayout());
panel.add(firstNameLabel);
panel.add(firstNameTextField);
panel.add(lastNameLabel, "gap unrelated");
panel.add(lastNameTextField, "wrap");
panel.add(addressLabel);
panel.add(addressTextField, "span, grow");

Take a look at the demo applications to see a lot of examples using MiGLayout.

Posted by Martijn van de Rijdt at 14:02 on Monday 24 January    Add 'Visage Android' site to delicious  Add 'Visage Android' site to technorati  Add 'Visage Android' site to digg  Add 'Visage Android' site to dzone

I’m interested in Android, and I’m interested in Visage. So I’m definitely interested in Visage for Android!

In this article, Stephen Chin describes how he wrote a Visage port of a typical Android settings screen and compares the two implementations.

Posted by Martijn van de Rijdt at 22:14 on Tuesday 23 November    Add 'Devoxx 2010' site to delicious  Add 'Devoxx 2010' site to technorati  Add 'Devoxx 2010' site to digg  Add 'Devoxx 2010' site to dzone

Last week I was at Devoxx! There will probably be more in-depth blog posts here about some of the sessions, but for now, here’s an overview of all of the sessions I was able to attend and my own impressions.

Wednesday

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Posted by Jan-Hendrik Kuperus at 10:48 on Tuesday 21 September    Add 'JavaFX 2.0 – The Roadmap!' site to delicious  Add 'JavaFX 2.0 – The Roadmap!' site to technorati  Add 'JavaFX 2.0 – The Roadmap!' site to digg  Add 'JavaFX 2.0 – The Roadmap!' site to dzone

Yesterday, Oracle announced their plans for JavaFX 2.0. So far the roadmap looks promising, containing some major changes. Once I’ve read it completely, I’ll write up a post discussing the changes.

For now, you can read the roadmap here: http://javafx.com/roadmap/

Posted by Jan-Hendrik Kuperus at 12:10 on Wednesday 8 September    Add 'JavaFX Grid Component Worries' site to delicious  Add 'JavaFX Grid Component Worries' site to technorati  Add 'JavaFX Grid Component Worries' site to digg  Add 'JavaFX Grid Component Worries' site to dzone

If you’re working with JavaFX, you will probably know these two truths:

  • The JFXtras library has some really awesome components
  • The JavaFX platform is trying out new controls in the preview packages

A good thing about this, is that the JavaFX team is taking the good stuff from the JFXtras library and putting it into the platform. A bad thing about it is you start to expect the preview controls have the same functionality as the JFXtras controls.

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Posted by Martijn van de Rijdt at 10:32 on Tuesday 31 August    Add 'HTTP Requester' site to delicious  Add 'HTTP Requester' site to technorati  Add 'HTTP Requester' site to digg  Add 'HTTP Requester' site to dzone

Yesterday I found a nice and simple JavaFX tool for firing off HTTP requests and examining the server’s response: HTTP Requester.

Found it via the blog of Jonathan Giles. His blog has a weekly Java Desktop links of the week feature, which seems worth following if you’re interested in JavaFX and/or other Java (desktop) GUI frameworks.

Posted by Martijn van de Rijdt at 18:48 on Saturday 14 August    Add 'Building a JavaFX project with Maven' site to delicious  Add 'Building a JavaFX project with Maven' site to technorati  Add 'Building a JavaFX project with Maven' site to digg  Add 'Building a JavaFX project with Maven' site to dzone

JavaFX is a fairly new language, so I was curious to see if Maven plugins to build JavaFX projects were already available. After considering the FEST JavaFX Plugin and after a failed attempt to get the Plexus Compiler Component for javafxc working, I decided to try out the JFrog JavaFX Compiler Maven Plugin.

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Posted by Jan-Hendrik Kuperus at 22:11 on Thursday 24 June    Add 'Integrating JavaFX with regular Java – Part 2' site to delicious  Add 'Integrating JavaFX with regular Java – Part 2' site to technorati  Add 'Integrating JavaFX with regular Java – Part 2' site to digg  Add 'Integrating JavaFX with regular Java – Part 2' site to dzone

In my previous post about integrating JavaFX with regular Java, I briefly showed you how to properly construct a JavaFX object. This post will elaborate on that principle and provide the JavaFX UI a way to communicate with the Java ‘backend’.

Before I continue, I will explain the design of the application in which I used the method described below. This will allow you to decide whether this is also the way to go for your application, or maybe you still want to try something else. Ok, ready? Here we go!

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Posted by Jan-Hendrik Kuperus at 14:51 on Sunday 30 May    Add 'Integrating a JavaFX UI with regular Java – Part 1' site to delicious  Add 'Integrating a JavaFX UI with regular Java – Part 1' site to technorati  Add 'Integrating a JavaFX UI with regular Java – Part 1' site to digg  Add 'Integrating a JavaFX UI with regular Java – Part 1' site to dzone

When JavaFX was first released, I didn’t give it much attention, as it felt like yet another visualization platform. With the latest release of JavaFX 1.3 and a project requiring a ‘fancy’ user interface, it was time to give it a try. The surprise came quickly: after downloading NetBeans and the JavaFX runtime, I was able to quickly build user interfaces that actually look cool.

After some tutorials and many bogus screens with crazy animations, it was time to put JavaFX to work on a real project. We had an application that receives a lot of data, processes this and stores it in a database. The data reception and processing were already fully developed in ‘regular’ Java using the Spring framework. The goal was to somehow try and integrate this existing code with a fancy JavaFX interface to visualize the data.

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Posted by Martijn Schlief at 11:52 on Tuesday 1 September    Add 'More Reasons to Use JavaFX for Your Next Mobile Application' site to delicious  Add 'More Reasons to Use JavaFX for Your Next Mobile Application' site to technorati  Add 'More Reasons to Use JavaFX for Your Next Mobile Application' site to digg  Add 'More Reasons to Use JavaFX for Your Next Mobile Application' site to dzone

Read this blog from Sun about the JavaFX 1.2 APIs: More Reasons to Use JavaFX


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