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Posted by jcn at 16:35 on Monday 11 December    Add 'Dojo and Faces: een enterprise-ready rich GUI' site to delicious  Add 'Dojo and Faces: een enterprise-ready rich GUI' site to technorati  Add 'Dojo and Faces: een enterprise-ready rich GUI' site to digg  Add 'Dojo and Faces: een enterprise-ready rich GUI' site to dzone

Na de lunch is er een duo-presentatie van John Fallows en Jonas Jacobi, over Dojo en Java Server Faces (JSF).
Beiden hebben gewerkt aan het ADF-Faces project van Oracle, en de donatie hiervan aan de Apache community. Daarnaast zijn John en Jonas de auteurs van het boek “Pro JSF and Ajax”, dat ik voor de JSF die-hards (of wie dat wil worden) beslist kan aanraden.

De presentatie begint met de de vraag waarom men een combinatie van JSF en Dojo zou moeten gebruiken. Hun antwoord daarop is dat JSF inmiddels een standaard Web UI technologie is, gebaseerd op hetzelfde event driven component model als Swing. Maar helaas is de standaard HTML Renderkit van JSF onbruikbaar voor een dynamische GUI. Omdat je met Dojo middels templating en JavaScript eenvoudig GUI widgets kunt maken, is het logisch om Dojo en JSF te combineren.
Volgens Jonas en John levert de combinatie van JSF en Dojo ons (door JSF) enterprise ready (en door Dojo) killer web applicaties op.

Waarom JSF? Waarom Dojo?

Zoals vermeld, essentieel hierbij is de ‘templating’ mogelijkheid van Dojo. Het blijkt handig om als eerste stap een werkend HTML prototype van de nieuwe custom widget te maken. Zodra dat werkt (met Dojo), is het relatief eenvoudig om daar een JSF component van de maken die herbruikbaar is binnen verschillende applicaties.
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Posted by Barend Garvelink at 13:07 on Sunday 29 October    Add 'MyFaces: the emperor has no clothes' site to delicious  Add 'MyFaces: the emperor has no clothes' site to technorati  Add 'MyFaces: the emperor has no clothes' site to digg  Add 'MyFaces: the emperor has no clothes' site to dzone

Op Ignacio Coloma’s weblog is een lange post verschenen over de pitfalls van Java ServerFaces. Zijn project begon voorspoedig, maar liep al snel tegen grote problemen aan die deels zijn terug te voeren op MyFaces en deels inherent zijn aan de JSF spec.

These are the conclusions of a medium-sized JSF project (about 30 man-months), and big heaps of hard work. The start was simple: the component/renderer/validator/converter model is clean and easy to get up and running. The validation model works like a charm, JSP pages are quite minimal and you can get a working skeleton of your application in a snap.

[http://icoloma.blogspot.com/2006/10/myfaces-emperor-has-no-clothes.html]

Posted by Eric Gunnewegh at 8:16 on Tuesday 24 October    Add 'AJAX JSF Frameworks Review' site to delicious  Add 'AJAX JSF Frameworks Review' site to technorati  Add 'AJAX JSF Frameworks Review' site to digg  Add 'AJAX JSF Frameworks Review' site to dzone

This review gives a summary on current commercial JSF Frameworks that use Ajax to update the website. The frameworks Icefaces, Netadvantage and Quipukit will be compared by analyzing specific components to each other.

Aan het einde van het artikel wordt verwezen naar een matrix waarin nog meer Ajax en JSF frameworks vergeleken worden. Deze is zeker de moeite waard om eens aandachtig te bekijken: www.jsfmatrix.net

Posted by Eric Gunnewegh at 8:12 on Wednesday 30 August    Add 'Developing applications with Facelets, JSF, and JSP' site to delicious  Add 'Developing applications with Facelets, JSF, and JSP' site to technorati  Add 'Developing applications with Facelets, JSF, and JSP' site to digg  Add 'Developing applications with Facelets, JSF, and JSP' site to dzone

JavaServer Faces (JSF) along with Facelets and JavaServer Pages (JSP) 2.0+ promotes a new way of Java web programming. This article introduces a rich list of useful tips to help developers smoothly transition from the old-fashioned JSP/servlet programming to the new JSF-style programming. It clarifies the issues and confusion developers may encounter, and promotes best practices and methodologies to simplify web development, improve code reuse, and make source code more designer-friendly, as well as easy-to-maintain.

Posted by Ruud Steeghs at 12:01 on Monday 15 May    Add 'JSF frameworks: Shale and Seam' site to delicious  Add 'JSF frameworks: Shale and Seam' site to technorati  Add 'JSF frameworks: Shale and Seam' site to digg  Add 'JSF frameworks: Shale and Seam' site to dzone

Summary
JSF (JavaServer Faces) was created to address many of the shortcomings present in its Java Web-tier predecessors: JavaServer Pages (JSP) and servlets. But although JSF incorporates many novel approaches to developing Web-based applications from earlier technologies, bringing in a fresh approach to developing Java on the Web tier also comes with its share of challenges. To this end, two frameworks are already being used to streamline the use of JSF components in combination with other Java elements: Shale, developed by the Apache Software Foundation, and Seam, developed by JBoss. This article describes the value these two frameworks bring to your developments with JavaServer Faces. (3,800 words;

Posted by Ruud Steeghs at 14:15 on Sunday 22 January    Add 'Tim Shadel says JSF isn’t their choice for the future' site to delicious  Add 'Tim Shadel says JSF isn’t their choice for the future' site to technorati  Add 'Tim Shadel says JSF isn’t their choice for the future' site to digg  Add 'Tim Shadel says JSF isn’t their choice for the future' site to dzone

Tim Shadel, in a podcasted talk linked to from “JSF: The 7-Layer Burrito I Won’t Eat Again,” says that after using JavaServer Faces for months, they’ve decided that they wouldn’t use JSF in the future. The primary reason? JSF uses POST, not GET, and as a result, links to specific aren’t conversational state isn’t preserved, unlike with REST.

In the podcast, he says that the URL hiding affects JSF from start to finish. While he says JSF may be all right for applications that use internal state, it will be awful for applications that should expose content urls to, say, search engines – like blogs or other content applications. Further, the URL hiding affects deployment, because applications can’t refer to other applications’ states.

The JavaServer Faces specification does indicate that POST is used exclusively; the form tag doesn’t define a pass-through attribute for “method” to allow use of GET, and while it may be possible to create a render kit for JSF that enables use of alternate methods, this seems like a strange requirement for application developers. However, a quick search on Google does show a few examples of embedding data in a URL for use in JSF.

Of further interest is the note that this is the “first of a long list of reasons why the JSF 7-layer burrito won’t be on my round for seconds.”

What are your experiences and opinions about this? Is this a critical limitation of JSF? Would this affect your willingness to adopt JSF in public-facing applications? Why or why not?

Posted by Hans-J├╝rgen Jacobs at 15:37 on Friday 26 August    Add 'JavaServer Faces vs Tapestry – A Head-to-Head Comparison' site to delicious  Add 'JavaServer Faces vs Tapestry – A Head-to-Head Comparison' site to technorati  Add 'JavaServer Faces vs Tapestry – A Head-to-Head Comparison' site to digg  Add 'JavaServer Faces vs Tapestry – A Head-to-Head Comparison' site to dzone

In this article, Phil Zoio puts these frameworks head-to-head, comparing each on its merits. He rates the two on critical aspects of their design, development and runtime environments. [theserverside]

Posted by jcn at 2:15 on Thursday 1 July    Add 'Making advanced components with JSF and SVG' site to delicious  Add 'Making advanced components with JSF and SVG' site to technorati  Add 'Making advanced components with JSF and SVG' site to digg  Add 'Making advanced components with JSF and SVG' site to dzone

Ik dacht dat deze presentatie ging over het maken van herbruikbare webgui componenten. Daar ging het ook wel over, maar toch anders dan verwacht. De nadruk lag vooral op het gebruik van SVG (Scaled Vector Graphics, een XML-taal voor 2D graphics) in een web-context.
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