Links

  • 1. Sogeti
  • 2. JBoss
  • 3. IBM
  • 4. Oracle
  • 5. SpringSource
  • 6. NL-JUG
  • 7. Java

Archives

Syndication  RSS 2.0

RSS 1.0
RSS 2.0

Bookmark this site

Add 'JCN Blog' site to delicious  Add 'JCN Blog' site to technorati  Add 'JCN Blog' site to digg  Add 'JCN Blog' site to dzone

Posted by Martijn van de Rijdt at 12:41 on Wednesday 20 October    Add 'Maven dependency:tree' site to delicious  Add 'Maven dependency:tree' site to technorati  Add 'Maven dependency:tree' site to digg  Add 'Maven dependency:tree' site to dzone

If you’re interested in getting a quick overview of your Maven project’s dependency structure, the dependency:tree plugin is a very useful tool. Just run the following:

mvn dependency:tree

and you’ll get a nice overview of all of the artifacts your project depends on, directly and indirectly, displayed as a tree structure.

Now say you have a parent project containing a lot of modules (perhaps even nested) and you still want an overview of all of their dependencies. You could just run dependency:tree on the parent project, but that would output a huge list of all of the dependency trees, cluttered up with Maven’s informational log messages. You could also run dependency:tree on each individual leaf project, but that would be a bit of a hassle.

A better solution is to run the following on your parent project:

mvn dependency:tree -DoutputFile=D:\temp\dependencies-${project.artifactId}.txt

This will create some text files in your D:\temp directory, named after your projects’ artifact ids. Each of these text files will contain the corresponding project’s dependency tree.

Of course you can also use other Maven variables (like ${project.groupId} and ${project.version}) in the filenames.

Posted by Martijn van de Rijdt at 18:48 on Saturday 14 August    Add 'Building a JavaFX project with Maven' site to delicious  Add 'Building a JavaFX project with Maven' site to technorati  Add 'Building a JavaFX project with Maven' site to digg  Add 'Building a JavaFX project with Maven' site to dzone

JavaFX is a fairly new language, so I was curious to see if Maven plugins to build JavaFX projects were already available. After considering the FEST JavaFX Plugin and after a failed attempt to get the Plexus Compiler Component for javafxc working, I decided to try out the JFrog JavaFX Compiler Maven Plugin.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by Ron Lievens at 13:59 on Wednesday 2 December    Add 'Mijn standaard Jave/Eclipse ontwikkel omgeving' site to delicious  Add 'Mijn standaard Jave/Eclipse ontwikkel omgeving' site to technorati  Add 'Mijn standaard Jave/Eclipse ontwikkel omgeving' site to digg  Add 'Mijn standaard Jave/Eclipse ontwikkel omgeving' site to dzone

Na aanleiding van verschillede discussies over hoe de Java/Eclipse ontwikkel omgeving er uit moet zien, heb ik een voorstel voor een standaard Java/Eclipse ontwikkel omgeving gemaakt.

Mijn voorstel maakt volledig gebruik van open source tooling en is toegespitst op code kwalitie. Mijn voorstel bevat Apache Ant, Apache Maven2, Subversion, CheckStyle en Findbugs intergratie met Eclipse. Verder maakt mijn voorstel gebruik van de EclEmma eclipse plugin voor code dekking en uiteraard maak ik gebruik van de JCN Style Guide in Eclispe.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by Ruud Steeghs at 19:05 on Monday 29 May    Add 'The Maven 2 POM demystified' site to delicious  Add 'The Maven 2 POM demystified' site to technorati  Add 'The Maven 2 POM demystified' site to digg  Add 'The Maven 2 POM demystified' site to dzone

The evolution of a project model
This article finally pins down the elusive Maven 2 POM, version 4.0, the single largest configuration file you are likely ever to love. Readers will learn that the successful Maven 2 build system derives much of its power and portability from the POM, and that—despite what you may have heard—it is really not so bad after allJavaWorld


© 2020 Java Competence Network. All Rights Reserved.