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Posted by Martijn van de Rijdt at 10:32 on Tuesday 31 August    Add 'HTTP Requester' site to delicious  Add 'HTTP Requester' site to technorati  Add 'HTTP Requester' site to digg  Add 'HTTP Requester' site to dzone

Yesterday I found a nice and simple JavaFX tool for firing off HTTP requests and examining the server’s response: HTTP Requester.

Found it via the blog of Jonathan Giles. His blog has a weekly Java Desktop links of the week feature, which seems worth following if you’re interested in JavaFX and/or other Java (desktop) GUI frameworks.

Posted by Eric Gunnewegh at 7:56 on Thursday 14 December    Add 'JUnit Reloaded' site to delicious  Add 'JUnit Reloaded' site to technorati  Add 'JUnit Reloaded' site to digg  Add 'JUnit Reloaded' site to dzone

JUnit is the most widely used (unit-) testing tool in the Java world. With version 4, Kent Beck and Erich Gamma introduced the first significant API changes in the last few years. When the first release candidate was available back in 2005, you could hardly use it in a productive working environment due to the lack of tool support at that time. By now, most build tools and IDEs come with support for JUnit 4, so it’s about time to give it a try. This article describes what’s different compared to JUnit 3.8.x.

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 11:46 on Saturday 30 September    Add 'Testing Concurrent Programs' site to delicious  Add 'Testing Concurrent Programs' site to technorati  Add 'Testing Concurrent Programs' site to digg  Add 'Testing Concurrent Programs' site to dzone

In this article, Brian Goetz, author of the recently-released <i>Java Concurrency in Practice</i>, explores some of the major issues in testing concurrent classes, and offers some techniques for constructing concurrent programs that make them easier to test. [theserverside]

Posted by Ruud Steeghs at 9:40 on Thursday 17 August    Add 'Profiling Your Applications with Eclipse Callisto' site to delicious  Add 'Profiling Your Applications with Eclipse Callisto' site to technorati  Add 'Profiling Your Applications with Eclipse Callisto' site to digg  Add 'Profiling Your Applications with Eclipse Callisto' site to dzone

Callisto, a bundle of optional plugins for Eclipse, now comes with a profiling tool called the Test & Performance Tools Platform (TPTP). TPTP includes testing, tracing, performance monitoring, profiling, and static-code analysis tools. John Ferguson Smart offers this guided tour of how to use TPTP to speed up your apps. Read More

Posted by Ruud Steeghs at 18:54 on Wednesday 31 May    Add 'Ready To Test SOA, Web Services, ESBs, and BI?' site to delicious  Add 'Ready To Test SOA, Web Services, ESBs, and BI?' site to technorati  Add 'Ready To Test SOA, Web Services, ESBs, and BI?' site to digg  Add 'Ready To Test SOA, Web Services, ESBs, and BI?' site to dzone

Frank Cohen is an advocate for testing XML-based SOA, ESB, Web services and BI based services. In this article, Cohen outlines the steps and considerations necessary for adopting a test methodology that will lead to improved performance and scalability.

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 11:21 on Wednesday 15 March    Add 'In pursuit of code quality: Resolve to get FIT' site to delicious  Add 'In pursuit of code quality: Resolve to get FIT' site to technorati  Add 'In pursuit of code quality: Resolve to get FIT' site to digg  Add 'In pursuit of code quality: Resolve to get FIT' site to dzone

Whereas JUnit assumes that every aspect of testing is the domain of developers, the Framework for Integrated Tests (FIT) makes testing a collaboration between the business clients who write requirements and the developers who implement them. Does this mean that FIT and JUnit are competitors? Absolutely not! Code quality perfectionist Andrew Glover shows you how to combine the best of FIT and JUnit for better teamwork and effective end-to-end testing.

Read more in an article by Andrew Glover at [developerworks]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 13:26 on Monday 19 December    Add 'Add Zing to your unit tests' site to delicious  Add 'Add Zing to your unit tests' site to technorati  Add 'Add Zing to your unit tests' site to digg  Add 'Add Zing to your unit tests' site to dzone

Introducing a framework for generic, productive, reliable, and maintenance-free unit testsTanmay Ambre and Abhijeet Kesarkar [javaworld]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 13:34 on Wednesday 9 November    Add 'AOP@Work: Unit test your aspects' site to delicious  Add 'AOP@Work: Unit test your aspects' site to technorati  Add 'AOP@Work: Unit test your aspects' site to digg  Add 'AOP@Work: Unit test your aspects' site to dzone

AOP makes it easier than it’s ever been to write tests specific to your application’s crosscutting concerns. Nicholas Lesiecki introduces you to the benefits of testing aspect-oriented code and presents a catalog of patterns for testing crosscutting behavior in AspectJ. [developerworks]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 14:05 on Monday 7 November    Add 'Don’t sweat unit tests' site to delicious  Add 'Don’t sweat unit tests' site to technorati  Add 'Don’t sweat unit tests' site to digg  Add 'Don’t sweat unit tests' site to dzone

By hiding the services your code depends on behind interfaces and using jMock to mock out those interfaces, you can unit test anything. In this article, Graham King shows how to build a simple example application by testing first. He starts with simple, easy-to-test methods, then progresses to ones that require external infrastructure support. He shows how working with interfaces and using mock objects makes testing easy. [javaworld.com]

Posted by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs at 9:59 on Tuesday 18 October    Add 'Unit Testing Hibernate Mapping Configurations' site to delicious  Add 'Unit Testing Hibernate Mapping Configurations' site to technorati  Add 'Unit Testing Hibernate Mapping Configurations' site to digg  Add 'Unit Testing Hibernate Mapping Configurations' site to dzone

In the last few years, Hibernate has become one of the most popular Java open source frameworks available. However, developers don’t always remember that the mapping files that drive Hibernate’s behavior are as much a part of the program as the Java code. These files can contain defects, behave unexpectedly, and break when you change other parts of your system. In this article, I will show how you can use unit testing to assess the correctness of your Hibernate configuration. The article is a step-by-step approach that also explains some of the more common difficulties you may encounter while using Hibernate. [testdriven.com]


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